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What will be the first commercial flight of the Boeing 737 MAX since recertification?

 The Federal Aviation Administration lifted its ban on the Boeing 737 Max on Wednesday, 20 months after the aircraft was grounded following two crashes within five months that killed 346 people. The action means the FAA is satisfied that software and other fixes, and new pilot training, make the plane safe to fly again. Following recertification of the 737 MAX by the FAA, airlines in the US plan to resume flight operations. AmericanAirlines said on Wednesday it would make good on its plan to return Boeing’s 737 MAX jets to passenger flights by the end of 2020. A number of airlines may attempt to downplay the “MAX” branding on their fleets, although American Airlines disputes that they are attempting to do so. Instead, the airline reiterated that information regarding the type of aircraft will be made available to passengers upon booking. The ban is being lifted in a significantly changed environment, with the airline industry decimated by the coronavirus pandemic. Passenger numbers rem
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Swissport is ready for COVID vaccines

  Swissport is busy establishing operational readiness for the handling of highly temperature-sensitive vaccines. Vaccines and indeed many pharmaceuticals require rigorous temperature control throughout the entire supply chain. While some types COVID-19 vaccines might only call for temperatures around -20°C or in a range from 2°-8°C, others will likely require extremely low temperatures in the range of -70°C. In collaboration with Brussels Airport, Air Cargo Belgium and Hazgo, Swissport demonstrated its ability to handle highly temperature-sensitive air cargo at its state-of-the-art 3,620 sqm Pharma Center in Brussels. Two separate shipments were delivered to the facility, which is part of an end-to-end cool chain. One shipment arrived in a container cooled to -70°C, while the other shipment was transported in a more conventional 2°-8°C temperature range. Swissport’s top-notch infrastructure, combined with know how regarding dry-ice handling allows for a seamless temperature-control th

ACI and IATA reiterate call for industry-wide support to keep aviation alive and help recovery

 Airports Council International (ACI) World and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) – are calling again for global governments to use COVID-19 testing and not quarantines as a means to safely re-open borders and re-establish global connectivity and to prevent the systemic collapse of the aviation industry with non-debt generating financial support. The dual measures would protect countries from the importation of COVID-19 cases, avert an employment crisis in the travel and tourism sector, and ensure that the critical aviation structure remains viable and able to support the economic and social benefits on which the world relies. The Air Transport Action Group (ATAG) estimates that 46 million jobs are at risk because of the loss of connectivity caused by the COVID-19 crisis. The vast majority of these (41.2 million jobs) are in the travel and tourism sector which relies on aviation. The remainder (4.8 million jobs) are spread across direct employment in aviation, includin

6 months after COVID-19

In March and April 2020, when cases of COVID-19 peaked, airlines had to cancel hundreds of flights every day, ground fleets, and try to postpone aircraft deliveries. These rapid changes have massively altered how flights are performed and the way certain services are provided. One particular side effect of the pandemic is standing in the way of smaller, more efficient airlines . In the long run, it may result in reducing the number of flight frequencies, eventually cutting the number of travel options to choose from. On the plus side, airlines can increase their efficiency, save costs, minimize the impact on the climate and become even more competitive. Additional COVID-19 prevention measures come at a cost. The standard procedure of preparing a large Aircraft for a flight can be up to one hour longer, considering cabins need to be disinfected, and social distancing has to been enforced among passengers during boarding. The increase in idle time is a potential financial threat for airl

KQ's affected flights following the nullification of the TCAA's approval to allow the airline resume flights into Tanzania.

Following the nullification of the KQ's approval by TCAA that was to allow the airline resume flights into Tanzania, a number of flights have been affected. These flights as published on KQ's scheduled for August 2020 include: Nairobi - Dar es salaam, 14 times weekly Nairobi - Kilimanjaro, 2 times weekly Nairobi - Zanzibar, 3 times weekly Safari za Kenya Airways zilizoathiriwa kufuatia mamlaka ya usimamizi wa usafiri wa anga Tanzania, TCAA, kufuta kibali cha ruhusa ya kuja nchini Tanzania kwa shirika hilo. Safari hizi hazitaweza kufanyika kama zilivyokusudiwa mpaka mamlaka husika kutoa tena kibali cha kuruhusu shirika hilo kuja nchini. Nairobi - Dar es salaam, mara 14 kwa wiki. Nairobi - Kilimanjaro, mara 2 kwa wiki Nairobi - Zanzibar, mara 3 kwa wiki

TCAA nullifies all KQ permits for flights into the United Republic of Tanzania.

The Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority (TCAA) has "on a reciprocal basis” rescinded its approval granted to Kenya Airways to resume international flights to Tanzania. The retaliation is a reaction to Kenya’s omission of Tanzania from the list of 16 countries allowed to resume international flights into Kenya effective August 1, 2020, since the airports' shutdown in March when the coronavirus pandemic hit East Africa. The Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority (TCAA) has "on a reciprocal basis” rescinded its approval granted to Kenya Airways to resume international flights to Tanzania. The retaliation is a reaction to Kenya’s omission of Tanzania from the list of 16 countries allowed to resume international flights into Kenya effective August 1, 2020, since the airports' shutdown in March when the coronavirus pandemic hit East Africa. Kenya Transport cabinet secretary, James Macharia said flights from Uganda, Rwanda, Namibia, Morocco, Ethiopia Canada, Japan, South Korea, UAE

Pakistan International Airlines Banned from UK after pilots found to have fraudulent licenses.

Nearly a quarter of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) pilots have been found not to hold valid licences. An investigation following the Karachi air disaster in May, in which all passengers and crew lost their lives, revealed that 262 of 850 pilots had potentially fake licences or ones containing irregularities. It was believed that many had not even taken the Pakistan regulator’s pilot qualification examination. Some 150 pilots were suspended as investigations continue, according to a report by Forbes. The Pakistan flag carrier has now been banned from operating in both the US and the UK. The European Union Air Safety Agency EASA withdrew “third country operator” authorisation from PIA for six months from 1 July. The letter from EASA to PIA read: “There are strong indications that a high number of Pakistani pilots’ licences are invalid.” It added: “PIA persists in failing to demonstrate compliance with the applicable standards.” On the same day, the US Department of Transportation

Changes to air travel after Covid-19

Covid-19 turned out to be aviation's biggest farewell party, airlines currently have a surplus of planes with the need to conserving cash thus retiring the most costly ones the 4 engines A380s and B747s.  Airlines are using their smaller more fuel efficient aircraft as a result there is less first class inventory at the moment due to the demand for first class being low. Most airlines are only offering 2 class aircraft at the moment.  Planes are probably the cleanest they have been since they were new all from the effort being put in by most airlines in cleaning their planes. Airlines are also removing contact points at every stage of the journey with others adding additional flight attendants to clean the bathroom every 90 minutes. Most airlines will argue that social distancing doesn't work in the air all seats are being sold instead airlines are enforcing a ' no mask no fly ' rule with others and airports handing out hygiene kits containing gloves, a face mask antiba